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Organisations can’t be diverse or inclusive until HR professionals recognise the value of people with convictions

Despite having worked as a nurse for many years, Janice feels that HR departments are more interested in her conviction from 20 years ago than her abilities as a nurse. I’ve been a nurse for over 11 years and have worked in the same hospital department for

Being brave isn’t easy but it’s key to moving forward – Standing by my husband following his conviction

Standing by a partner convicted of a sexual offence is never an easy decision to make and as Julia’s story shows, can impact on many areas of your life. My husband Gary and I had been married for 12 years when he was convicted of a sexual

I thought the last people to judge me would be the solicitors I worked for

After working for a company for 25 years, Ian was distraught to learn that following changes to the Solicitors Regulation Authority’s Code of Conduct, he would have to disclose his 31 year old criminal record. Until August of this year I was employed in the accounts department

What’s the point of having a policy if an employer doesn’t bother to follow it?

Miski applied to a large, well-known employer and believed they would follow their published policy on recruiting people with criminal records. Here we look at how this employer approached asking, assessing and adhering to their own policy.   A couple of years ago I applied for a

I’m still struggling to get over my past but there’s help to improve my future – changes to filtering legislation

Although Helen has struggled to move on since receiving her convictions, she’s more hopeful that potential changes to the filtering process will improve her future opportunities.     I didn’t really get into trouble with the law during my ‘youth’. However, aged 14 I was arrested and

I’ve cleared the road for future employees at my company by challenging an ineligible DBS check

Having been in his job for a year, Colin was horrified to learn that his employers were going to be carrying out an ineligible criminal record check which would have disclosed his spent conviction. Read how Colin kept his job and got his employers to change their

A life sentence can sometimes be just the beginning of a new life

Oscar was released from prison in 2001 having served 10 years of a life sentence. In his opinion, the increase in criminal record checks and the fact that employers have become a lot more risk averse over recent years means that it’s a lot harder to find

A lifetime of helping people – don’t hold this one mistake against me

My life hasn’t always been easy. I’ve seen some real tragedy; not least my husband’s suicide which then led to my receiving a criminal record. I can’t begin to explain what was going on in my head following my husbands suicide. There were days when I thought

Five years in the life of a person with conviction

I’d like to share with you my journey since I received my conviction over 5 years ago. In 2010, I received a conviction – the first time ever I’d had a run in with the criminal justice system. Shortly after sentencing Shortly after I was sentenced, I fell

Links to policy and information

We categorise and tag posts to theRecord if they link to Unlock’s policy work or information. Links to policy work Unlock focuses on a number of key policy issues as part of its policy and campaign work. Making a close connection between personal stories and experiences posted on here

Is a caution really a ‘slap on the wrist’? – Not if you need a Police Certificate

I have, on rare occasions, recreationally used small quantities of ‘soft’ drugs, though less so as I’ve got older. I’m a professional, hard-working, and otherwise an entirely law-abiding citizen with no so much as a parking ticket. However, in 2011 I became a criminal and will be

Learning to forgive myself!

In the 1990’s I got a conviction for GBH. I hit a guy and he suffered brain damage; he very nearly died. At first I was told I would be facing a charge of murder. Things were so close. I found it very difficult in prison, beyond