Your Stories

This section contains the stories of people with convictions, with the focus being on life as a law-abiding person with convictions – covering both the successes and the difficulties.

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Scarred for Life: The Retention of Criminal Records and the Lack of Rehabilitation

By Ivan Marazion I write this article as someone who, in my younger days, had issues with addiction. Like many people who fall into addiction, I also fell into petty crime and in my late teens was convicted of theft and burglary. I must take responsibility for

Don’t give up

By Elaine I was 19 when I was convicted for theft from my employer.  I received 200 hours community service.  I couldn’t give a precise reason why I had stolen the money, it was many factors and this was a very low time for me.  Thankfully I

Been held back for 2 years from reaching my dream

  For the past 4 years my life has been on pause. I have been heavily relying on the reform to be put into place since 2012 when my goal was to become a Royal Marine Commando in the Royal Navy. I messed my life up by

Transition – You never truly fail until you quit

My journey of transition unwittingly began as I lay face down at the banking of the Thames surrounded by a group of armed officers after having failed miserably in my bid to evade capture after a 5 hour armed siege. What then ensued was a series of

Can filtering be challenged?

Anonymous In October 2001 I was convicted of “permitting premises to be used for producing cannabis” under Section 8 of the Misuse of Drugs Act. At the time, I was living with my partner and children in a relationship where domestic violence was occurring. On one occasion

Sophie’s choice – “My only option is to resign…I am living in constant fear of being found out”

Sophie* In the 1980’s I was convicted of two minor offences and given and Absolute Discharge. Two years later I got a job and started work.  I wasn’t asked to disclose if I had convictions, so I kept quiet. I thought that there was no point looking

Strange City, Fresh Start, New Life

G Leigh In 2006, after serving two years of a four year sentence for manslaughter, I found myself in a government hostel in a strange city. Within a week I registered with the local Job Centre, but every time I had to fill in the disclosure part

Avoiding certain jobs

David* As someone with a record, I often feel completely isolated. Going public with my past carries a huge risk – as do enhanced criminal record disclosures. For example, I work in a respected ‘status’ role in higher education within a niche subject with a small circle

Scott’s story

Scott Woodage I was fortunate to have a good upbringing and benefit from a private education. I have always had an entrepreneurial streak in me and even at a young age, I remember selling seashells to holidaymakers whilst on a family holiday in Barmouth. I made enough

Poem – Penrose steps

One. This is the first step. Star gazing, whilst we are plain sailing. And the moon phasing. Singing a tune that only you and I know. Two. Light exploding, pain slowing down every breath that I take. I can only dream. Life and its lies, little pleas.

Criminal Records Ruin Lives

Obsidian Black It’s now more than thirty-three years since I was released from prison. I thought then, naively, that the worst was over. I had served two years of a three and a half year sentence. But I didn’t realise then that the real punishment hadn’t even

A new lease of life

David Honeywell My recent book signing event at York’s Waterstones, where I was signing copies of my new autobiography, Never Ending Circles, gave me some time to reflect. Writing your life story really does bring about psychological and emotional changes inside you but little did I expect