Google effect – Archive

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Possible legal remedies for the online publication of spent convictions

If you have a spent conviction and are suffering reputational harm or distress as a result of material about that conviction being published online and/or which features in online searches against your name, legal remedies may be available. We are currently working with Carter-Ruck, a law firm

Japan recognises ‘right to be forgotten’

This was originally published in The Guardian and reports on how a Court in Japan have ordered Google to remove links to the criminal record of a Japanese man stating that ‘criminals are entitled to have their private lives respected and rehabilitation unhindered’.    Japan recognises ‘right to

The Google Effect – You can be forgotten!

I’d just started a new relationship when I sat my girlfriend down and disclosed my conviction to her. Out of interest, we decided to check Google to see if we could find out any information about my conviction on there – it was spent so I’d presumed

Success with dealing with the ‘google effect’

I would like to share with readers of theRecord how new rules allowing Google links to be removed (‘The right to be forgotten’) has turned my life around. I really do believe that it can be of use to people with convictions. Eight years ago I was in

A Past without End, or a Future with Dignity?

At the time of my conviction in 2010, I was a Church of England Minister. I had been going through a marital breakdown, and found myself in court for forgery and fraud against my former wife and her daughter. Upon conviction, I received a Community Order to

Has Google removed any results for people with convictions?

Since the “right to be forgotten” ruling in May 2014, Unlock have been receiving copies of requests that people with convictions have been sending to Google. So far, every single one that they’ve seen has been rejected (unless the facts that have been reported have been inaccurate).

Public interest, private curiosity and the right to be forgotten

by Andy I was convicted of a number of internet sex offences in 2010. My case appeared in the local newspaper twice:  at committal and the sentencing hearing. A few days after I was charged my half-sister – Anne – whom I had only met once only

The Right to Forget

Editorial There’s an interesting debate in the air regarding the EU ruling on ‘the right to forget’. The EU has just passed legislation that allows individuals to block access to outdated information and stories. On one side, individuals who want hide information on the internet about the

A glass ceiling? Good enough for a job, but not for a promotion

by Mary   In November 2009 I was dismissed from the post of a Council Principal Librarian. Although I had had an unblemished professional record since 1975, I became the victim of bullying and harassment by a jealous colleague who was acting up in the role of