Disclosure of criminal record – Archive

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There are people in the caring profession that care about people with criminal convictions: Getting a job in a care home

As a youngster growing up my life was extremely chaotic. A mixture of getting in with the wrong crowd and being mentally unwell meant that I picked up a series of convictions – shoplifting, assault, burglary and possession of heroin. However, there reached a point when I

Just because an employer doesn’t ask about criminal convictions don’t assume they won’t find out – especially if you’re under MAPPA

I’d like to bring to everyone’s attention the issues you may encounter if you’re not entirely clear about the types of restrictions or conditions that exist on your licence or the input that other organisations may have which you might not have been made aware of. This

Officer G – a prison officer in a million

I’ve been watching the news over the past couple of weeks which have shown some disturbing images of prison riots. Prison officers being interviewed in the press say that cuts in staffing mean they don’t have time to deal with individual prisoners’ requests and issues. They’re spending

“Let me put that in writing” – Why you should always confirm your criminal record in writing what you’ve said verbally

Back in 2011, I was arrested and charged. As a result of this, I lost my job and fell into deep despair. Anxiety issues followed and ultimately depression took hold. I was lucky that I still had my close friends and family for support but I struggled

A lifetime of helping people – don’t hold this one mistake against me

My life hasn’t always been easy. I’ve seen some real tragedy; not least my husband’s suicide which then led to my receiving a criminal record. I can’t begin to explain what was going on in my head following my husbands suicide. There were days when I thought

When is enough, enough?

From the age of twenty, I trained with The National Trust specialising in the repair of old buildings following which, I began my own building business. At the same time, I sang both at amateur level and professionally as a tenor in various local operatic companies. In

Five years in the life of a person with conviction

I’d like to share with you my journey since I received my conviction over 5 years ago. In 2010, I received a conviction – the first time ever I’d had a run in with the criminal justice system. Shortly after sentencing Shortly after I was sentenced, I fell

Going straight and loving it

I spent about 20 years of my life abusing drugs and grafting to pay for them (you name it, shoplifting, card fraud, car crime etc). I didn’t consider doing anything else, it was just a way of life for me. Well, as you can no doubt imagine, the

I disclosed, I was employed, then I was sacked?

I was convicted of assisting another person in claiming housing benefit.  I admitted the charge at the first opportunity and took full responsibility for my actions. I received a suspended prison sentence. Although this resulted in a life changing turn of events, I have tried to stay

59 convictions and only just going to prison!!!

I have a long criminal record (59 convictions under the Street Offences Act) and have experienced many barriers into employment. I was refused OFSTED registration due to my spent convictions when I wanted to become a child care practitioner and had to appeal OFSTED’s decision in a Care Standards