Disclosure of criminal record – Archive

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Despite my criminal record, I am a good Samaritan

It’s important that any organisation working with the young or vulnerable carry out proper risk assessments and, as George’s story shows, formal criminal record checks and assessments don’t automatically lead to you being refused a voluntary role. Just over two years ago I was convicted of an

“Acceptance was the answer to my problems” – Getting into university with an unspent conviction

Despite education being widely recognised as a key factor in successful rehabilitation, having to disclose a conviction will often mean that people with convictions are discouraged from applying. But, refusal from one university didn’t stop Henry from following his dream to study for a Masters. I’m so

I’ve been fortunate that my stupidity hasn’t been held against me

On paper Keith’s conviction for arson sounds terrible but, the key to his success has been his ability to disclose it openly and honestly to any college/university or employer that asks. I left home at the age of 16 and for the next two years stayed with

Allow me to talk about my past and you might give me a better future

Having a criminal record can make it difficult to get into employment but as Ben has discovered, a diagnosis of PTSD makes it even more so. I came out of prison after serving 3 months of a six-month sentence. To give you some background to my conviction,

Lets be inclusive not exclusive – a possible solution to re-offending

Andi is of the firm belief that inclusion is at the heart of preventing re-offending. Read how his own experiences have shaped his views. I had a childhood that was plagued with crime, poverty, drugs, violence and adversity. This meant spending some time in care, school exclusion

Disclosing convictions received during my employment

After receiving two convictions in a short space of time, Deena was anxious about having to explain them to her current employer. Having been employed for 5 years, she didn’t for one minute consider not disclosing and in this case, the result was positive. I’d worked for

Has ‘Ban the Box’ turned a job interview into another courtroom?

Many people with an unspent conviction will welcome an organisation removing the box asking about criminal convictions from their application forms. However, Noah feels that for individuals with more complex criminal records, there may be some unintended consequences of doing so unless employers make other changes too.

‘No’ didn’t mean ‘no’, it meant ‘not right now’ – getting a job on my second application

After having a job offer withdrawn after disclosing a conviction, Sam wasn’t put off from applying again for the same job two years later, only this time she was adamant that she’d get a different result.   Two years ago I was interviewed for a job with

‘Yes I’ve got some historic convictions but do the public really need protecting from me?’

People receive convictions for a number of reasons but as Gemma’s story demonstrates, what’s written on your DBS certificate will never adequately describe the story behind those offences. After a period of being free from offending, is there really anything to be gained by making people relive

Disclosing to an employer – Some ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts’

Having been through the process of disclosing her conviction to several employers over the years, Stacey provides some tips on what’s worked for her.   My conviction is now quite old and for many years I’ve been working very successfully in spite of it. In fact I’d

It’s my conviction, not my children’s – the problem with the disqualification by association requirement

Despite accepting her guilt and serving her prison sentence, Donna was horrified to learn that because of the career choices her children had made, they too would be affected by her criminal record.   I was recently released from prison having served 2.5 years for a sexual

The differing attitudes of employers towards criminal records makes securing a job even harder

Having received a particularly negative response to her criminal record from an employer (despite having worked for them on a temporary basis), Christine was on the verge of changing career. However, a more positive approach at her next interview convinced Christine that although the job she’d applied