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Volunteering taught me to work for a cause and not for applause

Toby has been volunteering for a couple of homeless charities over the last few years and is really keen to highlight how he’s benefited from volunteering.   Prior to receiving my conviction I had a pretty high profile job which provided me with a fantastic lifestyle and

It’s my conviction, not my children’s – the problem with the disqualification by association requirement

Despite accepting her guilt and serving her prison sentence, Donna was horrified to learn that because of the career choices her children had made, they too would be affected by her criminal record.   I was recently released from prison having served 2.5 years for a sexual

Changing my name has changed my life

From everything he’d read, Liam thought it unlikely that he’d be able to get Google to remove the links to his name. He decided therefore that he’d do the next best thing and change his name.   I’m a very lucky person. I come from a loving

Responding to rejection – my email to a recruitment agency after being told I was unsuitable

Like many of you who are reading this article, I’ve just had one of those ‘thanks but no thanks’ incidents following an interview arranged by a recruitment agency. I’ve had these types of responses before and felt upset, angry and deflated but this time, rather than just accept

Changing lives for the better through the power of football

  This story has been adapted from the original which was published on thefa.com website and we’d like to thank Pete Bell for giving us his permission to use it.   I’d just come out of Lincoln prison after serving three-months of a six-month sentence. I was

I was rejected from university because of my record, now I’m campaigning for fair treatment

I didn’t really ever class myself as an academic when I was younger. I didn’t engage at school – learning just didn’t seem to be something I was interested in. But when I found myself at Her Majesty’s Pleasure aged 21 it was a pivotal point in

‘Without a voice’ by Michelle Nicholson: A review

Michelle Nicholson is the founder and director of Key Changes -Unlocking Women’s Potential. We’re delighted to have been asked to review Michelle’s book, ‘Without a voice’, a brave and candid account of the events that led up to her conviction for murder.          

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theRecord relies on contributions from people with convictions. Articles are nearly always written by people with convictions rather than by organisations, and this page is aimed at those who wish to contribute their own stories and experiences of overcoming the issues relating to their criminal record. This

The long journey from crack to carer – Working in a care home

It’s often felt that jobs within health or social care can be difficult to get into if you have a criminal record. However, as Melanie’s story shows, people with significant criminal records can successfully get into this type of work.     I’m sitting at Gatwick Airport

A life sentence can sometimes be just the beginning of a new life

Oscar was released from prison in 2001 having served 10 years of a life sentence. In his opinion, the increase in criminal record checks and the fact that employers have become a lot more risk averse over recent years means that it’s a lot harder to find

Thanks to the police I’m able to pick my grandson up from school – Getting my SOPO discharged

It’s fair to say that the UK has some of the toughest restrictions on people convicted of sexual offences. Conditions included in SOPOs can be very restrictive and can have a huge impact on an individual’s ability to move on. However as Colin explains, his local police

Is ‘sealing’ criminal records the best way to help people turn their lives around?

Following David Lammy’s review of disproportionality in the criminal justice system, the spotlight is rightly on how to address the embedded inequalities and discriminatory practices that are driving the over-representation of black and minority ethnic groups. As part of this though, he has recognised the broader significant