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A lifetime of helping people – don’t hold this one mistake against me

My life hasn’t always been easy. I’ve seen some real tragedy; not least my husband’s suicide which then led to my receiving a criminal record. I can’t begin to explain what was going on in my head following my husbands suicide. There were days when I thought

I didn’t know the real sentence would start after leaving prison

I’ll start this with the following statement: If someone had told me I’d have a criminal record and get a prison term three years ago, I’d have laughed. However, the reality of this journey has been eye-opening and frightening! The pre-prison journey was horrendous and my lack

When is enough, enough?

From the age of twenty, I trained with The National Trust specialising in the repair of old buildings following which, I began my own building business. At the same time, I sang both at amateur level and professionally as a tenor in various local operatic companies. In

Five years in the life of a person with conviction

I’d like to share with you my journey since I received my conviction over 5 years ago. In 2010, I received a conviction – the first time ever I’d had a run in with the criminal justice system. Shortly after sentencing Shortly after I was sentenced, I fell

From brothel to boardroom

I would generally describe myself as a clever woman. I’ve had a good education. I’ve had some really good, well paid jobs. I’ve travelled the world. My social skills are fine and I’ve got a wide circle of friends. However, I’m not the smart a**e you might

Links to policy and information

We categorise and tag posts to theRecord if they link to Unlock’s policy work or information. Links to policy work Unlock focuses on a number of key policy issues as part of its policy and campaign work. Making a close connection between personal stories and experiences posted on here

From prisoner to Case Manager – Karen’s story

The article below was originally published on the Prisoners Education Trust website and we thought it would be of interest to people with convictions who are considering employment options available to them. Thanks to PET for giving up permission to re-post here.    In 2012, Karen received

Life’s about reinventing yourself, not finding yourself

I’ve been reading stories on theRecord for a while now and, following my own experiences recently, I’ve felt compelled to write something in the hope that even if I can encourage just one person, then it’s been worthwhile. Five years ago I can vividly recall myself saying

Why do employers use criminal records? And why don’t they make their policy clearer?

I’ve just seen Unlock’s project aimed at employers. This looks at making the system fairer for people with convictions who are going through the recruitment process. I think this is a great idea. When I was looking for work, it was so frustrating applying for jobs, having

New York Times Editorial – A Criminal Record and a Fair Shot at a Job

This was originally published by the New York Times on the 13th November and we thought it would be of interest to people with convictions. A Criminal Record and a Fair Shot at a Job Nineteen states and 100 cities and counties forbid public agencies — and in some

Recruitment agencies expecting ‘clear’ disclosures

When it comes to jobs that are exempt from the Rehabilitation of offenders Act, the law says you still need to disclose on an application form when asked about spent cautions or convictions regardless to however minor. In my case I will discuss about a caution from

UK versus the USA – The Criminal Records Debate

I have a older sister, a Green card holder, who resides in the USA, and I’ve travelled there many times pre the 9/11 attacks. I am deeply proud to say that as a reformed and rehabilitated law abiding ex-criminal with spent convictions, I have considered going back