Posts relating to stopping the ‘Google-effect’ with spent convictions

Below you will find posts relating to Unlock’s policy work on stopping the Google-effect with spent convictions

Sort Posts by:

I fought the big guys and won – getting a newspaper article removed

Having successfully applied to have links to her name removed from search engines such as Google and Bing, Lucy decided to make a request to the newspaper to have the source article taken down. My conviction was 25 years ago but it had made the press and

Possible legal remedies for the online publication of spent convictions

If you have a spent conviction and are suffering reputational harm or distress as a result of material about that conviction being published online and/or which features in online searches against your name, legal remedies may be available. We are currently working with Carter-Ruck, a law firm

Japan recognises ‘right to be forgotten’

This was originally published in The Guardian and reports on how a Court in Japan have ordered Google to remove links to the criminal record of a Japanese man stating that ‘criminals are entitled to have their private lives respected and rehabilitation unhindered’.    Japan recognises ‘right to

The Google Effect – You can be forgotten!

I’d just started a new relationship when I sat my girlfriend down and disclosed my conviction to her. Out of interest, we decided to check Google to see if we could find out any information about my conviction on there – it was spent so I’d presumed

Success with dealing with the ‘google effect’

I would like to share with readers of theRecord how new rules allowing Google links to be removed (‘The right to be forgotten’) has turned my life around. I really do believe that it can be of use to people with convictions. Eight years ago I was in