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The Google Effect – You can be forgotten!

I’d just started a new relationship when I sat my girlfriend down and disclosed my conviction to her. Out of interest, we decided to check Google to see if we could find out any information about my conviction on there – it was spent so I’d presumed

Success with dealing with the ‘google effect’

I would like to share with readers of theRecord how new rules allowing Google links to be removed (‘The right to be forgotten’) has turned my life around. I really do believe that it can be of use to people with convictions. Eight years ago I was in

Has Google removed any results for people with convictions?

Since the “right to be forgotten” ruling in May 2014, Unlock have been receiving copies of requests that people with convictions have been sending to Google. So far, every single one that they’ve seen has been rejected (unless the facts that have been reported have been inaccurate).

Functioning on a daily basis with a sexual offences order

I hear so many stories about the difficulties that people encounter trying to live with Sexual Offences Prevention Orders (SOPO’s) or Sexual Harm Prevention Orders (SHPO’s). If you’ve just been given a SOPO/SHPO and are struggling to see how you’re ever going to be able to live

Japan recognises ‘right to be forgotten’

This was originally published in The Guardian and reports on how a Court in Japan have ordered Google to remove links to the criminal record of a Japanese man stating that ‘criminals are entitled to have their private lives respected and rehabilitation unhindered’.    Japan recognises ‘right to

Are the changes to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act enough?

People with criminal convictions are not the most popular group in society. However, once somebody has served their sentence and doesn’t re-offend, it’s in everybody’s interests to enable them to move on positively with their lives and contribute actively to society. And we’re not talking about a

I got the link to my sexual offence conviction removed from a search engine

Russell felt strongly that as his conviction was spent, internet search engine links should be removed. Despite his request being refused by both the search engine and the Information Commissioners Office, Russell never gave up and his tenacity eventually paid off.   I was convicted of internet

Getting a US visa capped a very successful two years of rehabilitation post-conviction

Once you’ve received a conviction, it can be easy to assume that the worst will happen and life as you know it will end. However, as Ben has found out, if you plan for everything and don’t give up hope then there is light at the end

Getting help to have links to my name removed from an internet search engine

Paul’s life was still being seriously impacted by information about him online, some sixteen years after he’d received his conviction. With the help of solicitors, links to his name have now been removed which has had a huge impact on his life.      Having found myself

I’ve been given a new lease of life now that my name doesn’t come up on internet searches

Dave’s story shows how it is possible to get your convictions removed from internet and newspaper websites. He sets out below how he went about it.   Quite a few years ago, I ended up with a conviction, which was reported in the local newspapers and resulted