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An education, a job and a future; look how my life has changed

Despite a pretty awful childhood, the support of her foster family enabled Maddie to follow her dream of becoming a social worker. My childhood sounds like something from a Martina Cole novel. I came from one of those families that you see on the Jeremy Kyle show.

Invitation to Prisoners’ Education Trust’s Alumni Party

Every year the Prisoners’ Education Trust (PET) funds around 2,000 people to take distance-learning courses in prison, and this summer, they are throwing a party to celebrate their success. PET would like to invite anyone who has been involved in prison education to join them for an

Barriers to education – see the person, not the offence

  This petition was originally published by Kim and can be found at Petitions24.com.  Many of you will have come across similar problems and may have been prevented from completing a course of study due to problems securing work placements. If you agree with the issues raised, please

No challenge, no change – from drug dealer to university student

Devon was involved in criminality for a long time, recruiting children to deliver drugs for him and teaching them how to avoid arrest. Following a spell in prison, he’s put his previous life behind him and is learning how to gain respect from education. From a very

“I didn’t think that my dad was at risk of dying when he was sent to prison” – The impact of coronavirus on people in prison

If you’ve got a parent or family member who is over 70 then you’ll no doubt have been concerned to learn that this put’s them at greater risk of contracting coronovirus. But what if they were in prison where they can’t self-isolate and you can’t check that

“Acceptance was the answer to my problems” – Getting into university with an unspent conviction

Despite education being widely recognised as a key factor in successful rehabilitation, having to disclose a conviction will often mean that people with convictions are discouraged from applying. But, refusal from one university didn’t stop Henry from following his dream to study for a Masters. I’m so

Should my past forever define who I am?

Sadly, AJ’s story is not an unusual one. As a young man, he made some bad choices which saw him sent to prison. Yet despite spending the last 9 years trying to make amends, it seems as though he’ll never be allowed to leave the past behind.

A journey from entering the Koestler Awards to studying at the Royal Drawing School

This post originally appeared on the Koestler Arts website and is reproduced with permission and thanks. I found my creative side about 12 years ago whilst I was serving a six-year sentence in a young offender institution. I was locked up for 23 hours a day, in

Isn’t 45 years long enough to have to disclose a criminal record?

Laura has been able to work very successfully as a librarian despite her criminal record. However, she feels strongly that the current disclosure laws need to be changed so that there comes a time when people with very old convictions no longer have to reveal them to

Teaching is facing a recruitment crisis; how can it be turned around?

Several years ago, The Guardian published an article about the crisis in the recruitment of teachers. Since then, things haven’t got much better however as an ex-teacher with a criminal record, I’ve got my own ideas on how to improve the recruitment problem. Back in 2017, it

Lets be inclusive not exclusive – a possible solution to re-offending

Andi is of the firm belief that inclusion is at the heart of preventing re-offending. Read how his own experiences have shaped his views. I had a childhood that was plagued with crime, poverty, drugs, violence and adversity. This meant spending some time in care, school exclusion

I’ve worked hard to be part of a system that’s now holding me back – problems with the UK criminal record disclosure system

There are many people who, as youths, picked up convictions for minor offences. However, having worked hard to gain an education and contribute to society, they find themselves in a similar situation to Tom – being judged by employers who only see them as a safeguarding risk.